eblog
I have written in this space previously about the dangers of crowd-funding, with a focus on audio products. Since then, many more crowd-funded audio products have not been delivered, or delivery has been substantially delayed, sometimes by up to two years.
I am always disappointed when I read misinformation on the internet. Firstly because it is misinformation, and the more of it there is on the internet, the less useful the internet becomes. Secondly because of the number of people who will be deceived by this information and make poor decisions (including purchasing decisions) as a result.
I bought a pair of ear-buds the other day. They sounded awful. I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised, because I paid only $12 for them. Why?
If you’re new to the audio world, you’ll probably be horrified to learn that back in the 70s, the maximum warranty period on any hi-fi component was one year
Have you ever been rick-rolled? I have…several times. I didn’t really find it funny, just confusing, because I had no idea I was the butt of an Internet joke.
If engineers are ruining the sound quality of the music before the final masters, why are we so concerned about the relative merits of DSD, PCM and the sound quality of our hi-fi equipment?
Listening sessions. What are they really for? Contrary to a belief that’s unfortunately gaining traction, a listening session is not so you can ‘discover new music’, listen to whatever’s trending at the time, or even to hear your favourite music played to its best advantage.
Crowd-funding hi-fi projects: What could possibly go wrong? Lots, actually, as has already been proved by other projects that have gone horribly awry...
It helps to think laterally before you start posting critiques on audio forums.
If you have any multi-disc CD sets where the CDs have been kept apart by thin slivers of foam they're probably unplayable, and you won't be able to replace them... even for hard cash...
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